Crop Progress - State Stories
Crop Progress - State Stories 

ISSN: 2470-9816

Released January 5, 2021, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service 
(NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of 
Agriculture (USDA).

ALABAMA:     December temperatures were generally on par with historic 
averages. Total rainfall for the month ranged from 2.0 inches to 8.3 inches. 
According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, 8 percent of the State was 
experiencing abnormally dry conditions by month's end, compared to 12 percent 
at the beginning of the month. As a whole, agricultural activities were 
normal for the time of year, with no extraordinary events or pest pressure to 
report. Producers finished harvesting row crops and planting winter wheat in 
a timely manner. Winter wheat was progressing well, and its condition was 
fair to excellent, depending on location. Cover crop planting progressed on 
schedule, and the crop was off to a good start. Cattle remained in mostly 
good condition. Pasture grasses and winter grazing looked good, albeit 
progressing slowly. Producers supplemented winter grazing with hay and feed. 
Hay stocks were adequate. In addition to normal field activities for this 
time of year, some producers continued to work on repairing or rebuilding 
structures that were damaged by hurricanes Sally and Zeta.
ALASKA:     DATA NOT AVAILABLE
ARIZONA:     This report for Arizona is for the entire month of December 
2020. By the end of the month, cotton harvest was 97 percent complete 
compared to 75 percent on the last report and 95 percent for the previous 
year, according to the Mountain Regional Field Office of the National 
Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Thirty-nine percent of barley has been 
planted and 30 percent has emerged. Twenty-four percent of Durum wheat has 
been planted and 20 percent has emerged. Alfalfa conditions were rated mostly 
excellent to good, depending on location last week with harvesting taking 
place on more than three-quarters of the alfalfa acreage across the State. 
For the entire State, pasture and range conditions were rated mostly very 
poor to poor. Severe to exceptional dryness in the entire State continues to 
affect pasture and range conditions, forage growth, soil moisture, stream 
water, and stock tanks. Ranchers have continued to reduce their herds or ship 
livestock out of state.
ARKANSAS:     For the week ending January 3, 2021, days suitable for 
fieldwork 2.0 days. Topsoil moisture 2% short, 31% adequate, 67% surplus. 
Subsoil moisture 2% very short, 3% short, 40% adequate, 55% surplus. The 
month of December was wetter than normal with temperatures slightly above 
average. Producers were battling with wet and muddy conditions as hay feeding 
continued. Winter wheat and cover crops have mostly fared well but some areas 
were reported flooded. The State average rainfall was 4.73 inches for the 
month of December with an average temperature of about 43 degrees. Overall, 
rainfall has been plentiful for this time of year in the State, but average 
temperatures are slightly above normal.
CALIFORNIA:     Topsoil moisture 20% very short, 50% short, 30% adequate. 
Subsoil moisture 60% very short, 20% short, 20% adequate. Temperatures for 
the month averaged 48.9 degrees, 1.8 degrees above normal. Statewide average 
precipitation was 1.25 inches. Cropland was being prepared for upcoming 
plantings. A weather system is expected this week, which will bring much 
needed rainfall. The winter wheat crop has emerged. Flooded rice fields were 
observed. Citrus growers irrigated their groves during December using wells 
due to the lack of rain. Cool temperatures have been good for grape sugar 
(brix) content with no major freeze events as of yet. Fungicides were applied 
through sprinklers to winter carrots. The winter shake continued on almonds 
and pistachios. Growers also applied pre-emergent herbicides to their 
orchards.
COLORADO:     This report for Colorado is for the entire month of December 
2020. Topsoil moisture 33% very short, 44% short, 23% adequate. Subsoil 
moisture 35% very short, 48% short, 17% adequate. Winter wheat condition 15% 
very poor, 19% poor, 47% fair, 18% good, 1% excellent. Livestock condition 1% 
very poor, 6% poor, 33% fair, 49% good, 11% excellent. Pasture and range 
condition 29% very poor, 36% poor, 29% fair, 6% good. Moderately dry weather 
across the State during the month of December was interspersed with a few 
productive snow storms, according to the Mountain Region Field Office of the 
National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Overall, the entire State 
remained in moderate to exceptional drought, according to the latest U.S. 
Drought Monitor report. In eastern counties, some areas benefitted from good 
snowfall while others remained mostly dry. Temperatures were generally above 
normal. Reporters noted winter wheat and pasture conditions remained stressed 
from continued lack of consistent precipitation, but the snowfall was 
welcome. More precipitation is needed to improve pasture and crop conditions 
prior to spring. Feed supplies were short as producers continued feeding 
livestock. In the San Luis Valley, soil moisture supplies remained short and 
little precipitation was received. Pasture and rangeland in the area remained 
very short and livestock producers were actively seeking any alternate winter 
grazing arrangements. As of January 1, 2021, snowpack was 83 percent measured 
as percent of median snowfall.
DELAWARE:     The State experienced excessive precipitation periods averaging 
from 6-7 inches of rain in most weeks, preventing some farmers from corn and 
soybean harvesting and cover crop planting. Some low areas were flooded, 
making the fields untillable in preparation for the upcoming crop-planting 
year. Overall, December saw poor drying condition days combined with cloudy, 
freezing, and poor sunshine days.
FLORIDA:     Total rainfall for the month ranged from no rain in a few 
locations to 4.8 inches in Escambia County. According to the December 29, 
2020 U.S. Drought Monitor, 10.7 percent of the State was experiencing 
abnormally dry conditions at month's end, compared with 0.8 percent at the 
beginning of the month. Average mean temperatures ranged from 48.2�F in 
Jasper County to 70.5�F in Monroe County. Pasture conditions remained mostly 
fair to good, throughout the month but experienced seasonal declines. At the 
beginning of the month, frosts caused damage to several pastures in the 
Panhandle and parts of the northern peninsula. Cattle conditions remained 
mostly good to excellent throughout the month. Cotton harvesting finished 
much later than normal, wrapping up by the final week of December. As cotton 
harvest finished up, cover crops were planted. Vegetable producers prepared 
their land for spring planting towards the end of the month. Sugarcane was 
planted and harvested in the southern part of the peninsula. Citrus 
activities were normal and included mowing, spraying, fertilizing, and 
general grove maintenance. Grapefruit, early and midseason oranges, and 
tangerines were harvested and processed.
GEORGIA:     Total rainfall for the month ranged from no rain in a few 
locations to 5.3 inches in White County. According to the U.S. Drought 
Monitor, December began with 37.5% percent of the State abnormally dry and by 
the end of the month, 34.2% was abnormally dry. Cold temperatures started 
early in the month and continued throughout the month. Ample rainfall in the 
last week of the month significantly affected planting and harvesting 
activates with some locations receiving 6 inches of rain. Freezing 
temperatures and heavy rains caused pasture conditions to be less than ideal 
and sloppy. Winter grazing and small grains were slow to grow due to the cold 
temperatures but benefitted from the rain. Hay consumptions for the month was 
mostly normal but availability was somewhat low in parts of north Georgia. 
Most of the cotton in the middle and southern part of the State was picked at 
the conclusion of the month. Pecan harvest moved closer to completion.
HAWAII:     DATA NOT AVAILABLE
IDAHO:     The Statewide temperatures in Idaho for the month of December were 
normal to above average throughout the State. Some storm activity picked up 
in the latter part of December. Some of that moisture fell as rain in 
northern Idaho, where winter had gotten off to a mild start. Higher 
elevations in northern Idaho reported good snow cover. Winter wheat was in 
good shape in Lewis County, although snow cover was needed before freezing 
temperatures arrived. It was still early for early calving in Idaho County. 
In the lower elevations of Boundary County, snow melted in portions of the 
valley, and green grass was visible. In southwest Idaho, early winter weather 
was seasonably cold with limited precipitation to date. Calving was just 
getting underway. Hay stocks of all classes were in good supply. Minimal snow 
and precipitation was reported in Elmore County. South central Idaho was dry 
and observed above average temperatures. There was not much winter stress on 
livestock or crops. In Camas County, there was little farming activity. A few 
feet of snow settled on the valley floor. The county hoped for more snow. 
Southeastern Idaho reported spotty snow and drier than normal conditions in 
most places. Cold temperatures were reported in Madison County. Most of the 
fields were snow covered. In Fremont County, most operations fed livestock 
and prepared for calving season. In Teton County, dry high-pressure weather 
patterns dominated the weather early in the month. Some bare pasture was 
observed. This was followed by snow later in the month. Grass-fed livestock 
producers were feeding hay for roughly a month.
ILLINOIS:     For the week ending on January 3, 2021. Topsoil moisture 3% 
very short, 9% short, 71% adequate, 17% surplus. Subsoil moisture 5% very 
short, 17% short, 65% adequate, 13% surplus. Statewide, the average 
temperature in December was 32.6 degrees, 2.8 degrees above normal. 
Precipitation averaged 1.75 inches, 0.94 inches below normal.
INDIANA:     Topsoil moisture for the month of December was 2% very short, 
12% short, 65% adequate, and 21% surplus. Subsoil moisture for the month was 
5% very short, 17% short, 64% adequate, and 14% surplus. Winter wheat 
condition was rated 1% very poor, 4% poor, 29% fair, 56% good, and 10% 
excellent. Statewide temperatures averaged 33.4 degrees, 2.3 degrees above 
normal for the month of December. Statewide average precipitation was 
1.87 inches, 1.19 inches below normal. December was off to a cold start, but 
quickly warmed up with temperatures remaining above normal for much of the 
month. Precipitation levels were well below normal for the month of December, 
but some rain and snow events towards the end of the month helped replenish 
soil moisture. The late-month rainfall caused muddy conditions in some 
pastures and standing water in some fields, particularly in the southern part 
of the State. Winter wheat conditions improved slightly from the previous 
month. Livestock were reported to be doing well. Other activities for the 
month included equipment maintenance, construction projects, and online 
education.
IOWA:     December brought unseasonably warm temperatures across the State 
for most of the month. Measurable snowfall was recorded the last week of the 
month which shut down most fieldwork. Fieldwork activities early in the month 
included finishing fall tillage, applying nitrogen and manure, and cleaning 
up from the derecho. Unlike the previous year, there were no reports of crops 
remaining to be harvested. Grain movement was brisk due to strong prices. 
Livestock continued to graze on corn stalks. The warm temperatures were 
beneficial for livestock with no major issues reported. Soil moisture levels 
are a widespread concern as farmers look forward to the 2021 crop year.
KANSAS:     For the week ending January 3, 2021, topsoil moisture supplies 
rated 14% very short, 29% short, 49% adequate, 8% surplus. Subsoil moisture 
supplies rated 11% very short, 34% short, 52% adequate, 3% surplus. Winter 
wheat condition rated 5% very poor, 12% poor, 37% fair, 40% good, 6% 
excellent. Cotton harvested 84%.
KENTUCKY:     For the month of December, Kentucky saw near normal 
temperatures and below normal precipitation. Throughout the month 
temperatures fluctuated and continued a below normal precipitation trend that 
started in November. Temperatures for the period averaged 38 degrees across 
the State, which was near normal. Precipitation (liq. equ.) for the period 
totaled 3.13 inches Statewide, which was 1.29 inches below normal and 71% of 
normal. The second half of the month did see an increase in precipitation, 
but this increase was accompanied by cold temperatures stunting pasture 
growth. For the month of December, hay supplies 1% very short, 7% short, 83% 
adequate, 9% surplus. Despite some harsh weather, the condition of livestock 
was mostly good. Livestock conditions 1% very poor, 3% poor, 22% fair, 61% 
good, 13% excellent. Condition of winter wheat 1% poor, 14% fair, 66% good, 
19% excellent. Tobacco stripping 83% complete.
LOUISIANA:     For the week ending January 3, 2021, days suitable for 
fieldwork 2.2 days. Topsoil moisture 1% short, 53% adequate, and 46% surplus. 
Subsoil moisture 1% short, 60% adequate, and 39% surplus. Conditions for the 
State were wet and cool during December. Sugarcane harvest continued through 
the month with most producers nearly completed. Ryegrass progress was slow in 
many areas. Vegetable crops were producing well. Average rainfall for the 
State was about 1.14 inches with an average temperature of about 50 degrees. 
Overall, rainfall was average but temperatures for the State have been higher 
than normal for this time of year.
MARYLAND:     During the month of December, the State experienced excessive 
precipitation periods in some areas. This prevented some farmers from 
harvesting corn and cover crop planting, but helped restore ponds and 
recharge streams. Overall, temperatures were in the normal range, with the 
occasional 10 degrees F above a normal high. No real sustained below average 
temperatures have occurred.
MICHIGAN:     Topsoil moisture 0% very short, 3% short, 91% adequate and 6% 
surplus. Subsoil moisture 1% very short, 6% short, 87% adequate, and 6% 
surplus. Winter wheat condition rated 1% very poor, 5% poor, 21% fair, 60% 
good, and 13% excellent. Precipitation for the month of December averaged 
2.25 inches throughout the State, 0.47 inches below normal. Temperature for 
the month of December averaged 28.8 degrees, 4.0 degrees above normal. The 
winter so far has been unusually mild across the State, but there has been 
sufficient precipitation to improve soil moisture content. Growers have found 
it fairly easy to take care of livestock, haul manure as needed, move hay and 
haul grain. Counties along the Lake Michigan shoreline have had adequate snow 
cover, but the ground has not been frozen, allowing fruit growers to prune 
older orchards. Weather conditions have been good for winter wheat in central 
counties and the Thumb region, but in southern counties, snow cover is very 
light. Other activities for the month included tiling work, purchasing seed, 
getting equipment ready for spring, and cutting firewood for next winter.
MINNESOTA:     December began with unseasonably warm weather. Unlike the 
previous year, there were only scattered reports of small acreages of corn 
still standing. Field activities included maintenance, tiling, and manure 
hauling. Pasture conditions were reported mostly favorable until blizzard 
conditions late in the month blanketed fields with snow. Some cows were 
reported still on stalk fields. Feed supplies were adequate throughout the 
State. A winter storm December 23-24 brought widespread snowfall of four to 
six inches. During this event, temperatures fell between 40 to 50 degrees 
Fahrenheit and localized snowfall totals were 9.5 inches at Two Harbors and 
8.7 inches in the Twin Cities. Most of December's precipitation came from 
this winter storm. The month ended with reports of colder temperatures and 
standing snow in the fields and pastures.
MISSISSIPPI:     For the week ending January 3, 2021, topsoil moisture 
supplies were 1% short, 60% adequate, and 39% surplus. Subsoil moisture 
supplies were 1% short, 73% adequate, and 26% surplus. Conditions for the 
month of December have been cool and wet. Most crops made it out of fields by 
early December, but current weather conditions have limited growth of winter 
forages. The State average rainfall was about 3.8 inches for the month of 
December with an average temperature of about 45 degrees. Overall, rainfall 
and average temperatures have been typical for this time of year in the 
State.
MISSOURI:     For the week ending January 3, 2021. Topsoil moisture 5% short, 
85% adequate, 10% surplus. Subsoil moisture 16% short, 82% adequate, 2% 
surplus. Winter wheat condition 2% poor, 45% fair, 45% good, 8% excellent. 
Statewide, precipitation averaged 1.50 inches for the month of December, 
1.27 inches below average. Temperatures averaged 35.7 degrees, 2.6 degrees 
above normal.
MONTANA:     This report for Montana is for the entire month of December 
2020. Topsoil moisture 15% very short, 46% short, 39% adequate. Subsoil 
moisture 13% very short, 42% short, 45% adequate. Winter wheat - condition 1% 
very poor, 4% poor, 30% fair, 58% good, 7% excellent. Winter wheat - wind 
damage 72% none, 14% light, 8% moderate, 6% heavy. Winter wheat - freeze and 
drought damage 83% none, 13% light, 3% moderate, 1% heavy. Winter wheat - 
protectiveness of snow cover 44% very poor, 56% poor. Pasture and range - 
condition 14% very poor, 28% poor, 50% fair, 8% good. Livestock grazing 
accessibility - 94% open, 6% difficult. Livestock receiving supplemental feed 
- cattle and calves 86% fed. Livestock receiving supplemental feed - sheep 
and lambs 85% fed. The month of December was exceptionally warm and dry for 
Montana, according to the Mountain Regional Field Office of the National 
Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Reporters across the State noted a 
lack of precipitation and high winds throughout the month of December. 
Temperatures across the State were higher than the daily historical averages 
for a majority of the month. High temperatures ranged from the high 20s to 
the mid-60s. Low temperatures ranged from the mid-40s to the teens. According 
to the U.S. Drought Monitor, approximately 63 percent of Montana is in a 
current state of drought, with about 8 percent of the State in severe or 
extreme drought.
NEBRASKA:     For the week ending January 3, 2021, topsoil moisture supplies 
rated 15% very short, 41% short, 41% adequate, and 3% surplus. Subsoil 
moisture supplies rated 16% very short, 47% short, 36% adequate, and 1% 
surplus. Winter wheat condition rated 4% very poor, 11% poor, 48% fair, 36% 
good, and 1% excellent.
NEVADA:     Topsoil moisture 50% very short, 10% short, 30% adequate, 10% 
surplus. Subsoil moisture 70% very short, 25% short, 5% adequate. 
Temperatures for the month averaged 32.2 degrees, 0.4 degrees above normal. 
Statewide average precipitation was 0.65 inches.
NEW ENGLAND:     New England States experienced very variable weather - cold 
days, snow, rain, and periods of warmth. In Maine, the ground water has been 
recharged by December rain and snowmelt. Local producers have received 
payments under emergency programs for pasture loss and for hauling water for 
livestock. According to a New Hampshire reporter, one storm in December 
brought anywhere from 3-12 inches of snow. Orchardists delayed the start of 
pruning until after mid - December. According to a Rhode Island reporter, 
while weather has been moderate and allows many animals to remain on pasture, 
the season's drought has left very little pasture remaining. Hay is a 
valuable commodity as herd owners are short even with NY and Canadian 
supplies. Vermont experienced great weather for getting fall manure out 
before the winter spreading ban. Some concern reported with freezing 
temperatures.
NEW JERSEY:     The State has experienced a harsh winter so far, with cold 
temperatures, snow, and rain. Some fields were very wet from a continued 
cycle of frequent rainfall. According to the December 16, 2020 State Board of 
Agriculture State Board grower comments, harvest was almost complete in north 
Jersey by mid-December. There was still some corn left to be harvested at 
that time. In December, growers finished harvesting soybeans and processing 
spinach. Vegetable and herb growers started up greenhouses for the spring 
crops. Deer, bears, and groundhogs have caused considerable damage to some 
crops and farmland.
NEW MEXICO:     This report for New Mexico is for the entire month of 
December 2020. Topsoil moisture 58% very short, 32% short, 6% adequate, 4% 
surplus. Subsoil moisture 59% very short, 31% short, 6% adequate, 4% surplus. 
Red chile harvested 97%, 93% last year. Corn harvested for grain 99%, 99% 
last year. Cotton harvested 99%, 97% last year. Pecans harvested 87%, 49% 
last year. Pecan condition 3% poor, 7% fair, 90% good. Winter wheat condition 
15% very poor, 22% poor, 14% fair, 28% good, 21% excellent. Cattle receiving 
supplemental feed 87%, 76% last year. Cattle condition 18% very poor, 12% 
poor, 36% fair, 17% good, 17% excellent. Sheep receiving supplemental feed 
85%, 77% last year. Sheep and lambs condition 39% very poor, 11% poor, 18% 
fair, 29% good, 3% excellent. Hay and roughage supplies 32% very short, 38% 
short, 30% adequate. Stock water supplies 38% very short, 24% short, 38% 
adequate. With little to no improvement in precipitation received during 
December, soil moisture levels continued to drop and supplemental livestock 
feeding continued to increase. Reports from several counties noted that the 
wheat crop - both irrigated and non-irrigated - was suffering due to the lack 
of moisture. In Union County, comments suggested that producers could not 
keep enough irrigation water on their wheat fields, and some fear the crop 
will not survive without improved natural moisture. With stock water depleted 
and hay supplies limited, ranchers across the State were choosing to 
partially or entirely cull their herds. Where available, cattle were turned 
onto winter grazing. Converted monthly moisture totals - accounting for any 
precipitation received as snow - ranged from approximately 3 inches to merely 
a trace, with widespread dryness across many eastern counties. Areas with 
above average precipitation were confined to northern, more mountainous 
counties. According to the United States Drought Monitor for December 29, the 
entire State was suffering from moderate drought or worse. Moderate drought 
(D1) was present across less than 1 percent of the State. Severe drought (D2) 
covered 17.3 percent of the State, compared with 20.4 percent on November 24. 
Extreme drought (D3) was present across 29.1 percent of New Mexico, compared 
with 28.3 percent on November 24. Exceptional drought (D4) continued to 
expand, and now covered 64,680 square miles, or 53.2 percent of the State.
NEW YORK:     The month of December was reported as being primarily a warmer 
month throughout the State with only snow cover and ice in some areas. A few 
areas reported being short on rainfall. Other areas reported heavy snowfall 
(30 to 40+ inches) and flooding from the snow melt. Field work included 
manure application where weather was favorable. Fall tillage and late harvest 
was completed.
NORTH CAROLINA:     For the week ending January 3, 2021 - Subsoil moisture 
21% adequate, 79% surplus. Topsoil moisture 17% adequate and 83% surplus. 
Barley condition 1% poor, 13% fair, 80% good, 6% excellent. Hay and roughage 
supplies 2% short, 92% adequate, 6% surplus. Oats condition 37% fair, 63% 
good. Pasture and range condition 2% poor, 53% fair, 44% good, and 1% 
excellent. Winter wheat condition 3% poor, 35% fair, 61% good, and 1% 
excellent. Throughout January, very wet conditions that was too wet for 
fieldwork. Wheat under stress. Recent rainfall events have saturated soils in 
the area. Most fields have standing water. Lighter, well-drained soils are in 
better shape but still wet.
NORTH DAKOTA:     For the week ending January 3, 2021, topsoil moisture 
supplies rated 28% very short, 43% short, 27% adequate, 2% surplus. Subsoil 
moisture supplies rated 24% very short, 42% short, 33% adequate, 1% surplus. 
Winter wheat condition rated 5% very poor, 17% poor, 52% fair, 25% good, 11% 
excellent. Cattle and calf conditions, 2% very poor, 5% poor, 19% fair, 59% 
good, 15% excellent. Sheep and lamb conditions, 0% very poor, 3% poor, 16% 
fair, 59% good, 22% excellent. Hay and roughage supplies, 5% very short, 16% 
short, 70% adequate, 9% surplus. Stock water supplies, 16% very short, 34% 
short, 50% adequate, 0% surplus.
OHIO:     Topsoil moisture for the month was 2% short, 51% adequate, and 47% 
surplus. Subsoil moisture for the month was 1% very short, 5% short, 63% 
adequate, and 31% surplus. Winter wheat condition was rated 1% poor, 26% 
fair, 57% good, and 15% excellent. The Statewide average temperature was 
33.4 degrees, 1.7 degrees above normal. Precipitation averaged 2.26 inches 
Statewide, 0.66 inches below normal for December. Heavy amounts of lake-
effect snow fell during the first week of the month, mostly in the 
northeastern part of the State. Other parts of the State saw variable 
conditions. Livestock were reported to be under stress and needed watching 
due to damp and fluctuating temperatures. Winter wheat stands remained in 
good-to-fair condition with no major freeze and thaw events so far this 
winter. Most unharvested corn was harvested by Christmas Day, but some 
remains in fields. Other farm activities for the month included draining and 
tilling fields.
OKLAHOMA:     For the month of December, rainfall totals averaged 2.84 inches 
throughout the State, 0.78 of an inch above normal. There was virtually no 
change in the U.S. Drought Monitor depiction for Oklahoma throughout the 
month, with a little over 25% of the State categorized in at least moderate 
drought. Broken Bow's 8.22 inches led the December totals. Boise City had the 
lowest total at 0.22 inches. Despite the winter weather, the Statewide 
average temperature was 40.8 degrees, 1.9 degrees above normal. Topsoil and 
subsoil moisture conditions were rated mostly adequate to short.
OREGON:     Statewide temperatures in Oregon for the month of December 
remained near normal to above average with heavy rain activity reported 
throughout the State. Benton, Lincoln, and Linn Counties reported extreme 
amounts of rainfall in the Willamette Valley caused creeks to overflow into 
fields and across backcountry roads. The grass crops looked good and provided 
grazing for livestock. In Polk County, winter wheat crops looked good. Grass 
seed crops looked average. Annual ryegrass grew well. Other grass seed crops 
were dormant due to the high water table or low temperatures. High Vole 
numbers were a problem; however, the rainy December may affect their numbers. 
Pasture grasses had no growth so most livestock feeding took place in barns. 
Goats and sheep were in barns preparing for kidding or lambing. In Columbia, 
Multnomah, and Washington Counties, fall planted crops were doing well. Some 
areas reported sporadic geese damage. High water occurred in rivers, which 
spilled out into fields in Clatsop and Tillamook Counties, leaving standing 
water in places. Pastures and cover crops looked good. Some geese and elk 
activity occurred. In Hood River, Sherman, and Wasco Counties, wheat was up 
and looked good. Livestock were also doing well with calving just around the 
corner for some producers. Winter wheat crops looked good in Morrow County. 
Baker, Grant, and Malheur Counties had snow followed by warm temperatures and 
rain. Winter wheat was in fair to good conditions in Umatilla and Wallowa 
Counties. Spotty fields filled in with the mild temperatures and rainfall. 
Douglas, Jackson, and Josephine Counties benefitted from the substantial 
winter rains recharging soil moisture. In vineyards and orchards, workers 
were pruning. Central Oregon reported normal rainfall and very little snow 
needed for the irrigation season. Snow pack was sparse in Klamath County.
PENNSYLVANIA:     Brief but heavy mid-month snowfall melted quickly as 
temperatures rose to finish out December, providing a needed recharge for 
ground water and soil moisture. Wet conditions have deterred fieldwork and, 
combined with warmer temperatures, have allowed for growth of chickweed, 
which may prove problematic.
SOUTH CAROLINA:     December temperatures were generally on par with historic 
averages. Total rainfall during the month ranged from 0.8 inches to 
6.3 inches. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, 13 percent of the State 
was experiencing abnormally dry conditions by month's end, compared to 
6 percent at the beginning of the month. The abnormally dry conditions 
remained confined to the southwestern border of the State. In central and 
eastern counties, occasional heavy rains delayed harvesting of late-season 
row crops and planting of small grains and cover crops. There were limited 
reports of abandoned cotton and soybean acres in the Midlands as a result of 
prolonged saturated soil. Most producers finished planting winter wheat, and 
the crop was progressing well. Overall, winter wheat condition was fair to 
good. Late-month freezes widely damaged uncovered or unprotected brassica 
greens. Strawberries were progressing nicely, and producers continued to 
treat for spider mites as needed. Vegetable crops in the Lowcountry were 
harvested under ideal conditions throughout the month. Pastures and cattle 
were in fair to good condition. Excessive rainfall in the Pee Dee region 
caused some health concerns in livestock, including coccidia, pneumonia, and 
salmonella. Winter annuals had slow growth from excessive moisture, but their 
establishment was generally good.
SOUTH DAKOTA:     For the week ending January 3, 2021, topsoil moisture 
supplies rated 21% very short, 38% short, 41% adequate, 0% surplus. Subsoil 
moisture supplies rated 23% very short, 40% short, 37% adequate, 0% surplus. 
Winter wheat condition rated 1% very poor, 7% poor, 55% fair, 36% good, and 
1% excellent.
TENNESSEE:     For the week ending January 3, Days suitable 3.0. Topsoil 
moisture 1% short, 60% adequate, 39% surplus. Subsoil moisture 4% short, 66% 
adequate, 30% surplus. Winter wheat condition 1% very poor, 2% poor 25% fair, 
56% good, 16% excellent. Pasture and Range condition 1% very poor, 14% poor, 
38% fair, 41% good, 6% excellent. Cattle condition 4% poor, 21% fair, 64% 
good, 11% excellent. Hay and roughage supplies 7% short, 78% adequate, 15% 
surplus. Tennessee experienced increased moisture in December. Some report 
saturated soils. Pastures have been impacted, leading producers to feed hay 
to livestock. Hay and roughage supplies appear adequate for the winter 
season. Winter wheat condition reported mostly good. Cattle condition is 
currently reported mostly good.
TEXAS:     During the month of December, precipitation mostly ranged from 
trace amounts to upwards of 3 inches, with isolated areas in East Texas and 
the Upper Coast receiving upwards of 8 inches of rain. Very isolated areas of 
East Texas and the Upper Coast received 10 to 15 inches. Cotton harvest was 
virtually complete throughout the State. Small grains seeding was nearing 
completion, however, development was behind normal in some areas. Livestock 
condition continued fair to good. Supplemental feeding continued Statewide.
UTAH:     This report for Utah is for the entire month of December, 2020. 
Topsoil moisture 18% very short, 52% short, 30% adequate. Subsoil moisture 
26% very short, 39% short, 35% adequate. Pasture and range condition 24% very 
poor, 35% poor, 33% fair, 7% good, 1% excellent. Winter wheat condition 5% 
very poor, 22% poor, 58% fair, 15% good. Hay and roughage supplies 2% very 
short, 17% short, 69% adequate, 12% surplus. Stock water supplies 21% very 
short, 34% short, 44% adequate, 1% surplus. Cattle and calves condition 1% 
very poor, 4% poor, 31% fair, 61% good, 3% excellent. Sheep and lambs 
condition 3% poor, 37% fair, 58% good, 2% excellent. Livestock receiving 
supplemental feed for cattle 78%. Livestock receiving supplemental feed for 
sheep 56%. Extremely dry conditions have caused water supplies to 
deteriorate.
VIRGINIA:     For week ending January 3; 2021, Days suitable 3.4. Topsoil 
moisture 5% short, 47% adequate and 48% surplus. Subsoil moisture 1% very 
short, 3% short, 57% adequate and 39% surplus. Winter wheat condition 12% 
poor, 46% fair, 39% good and 3% excellent. Barley condition 4% poor, 41% 
fair, 52% good, 3% excellent. Livestock condition 3% poor, 37% fair, 55% 
good, 5% excellent. Pasture and Range condition 3% very poor, 28% poor, 42% 
fair, 25% good and 2% excellent. Hay supplies 1% very short, 9% short, 79% 
adequate and 10% surplus. Percent of feed obtained from pastures 22%. 
Virginia experienced above average precipitation and normal temperatures in 
December slowing some grain crop harvesting. Muddy feeding/pasture conditions 
prevail due to rain and thawing during the day. Hay and roughage supplies are 
mostly adequate. Farming activities for the end of the month included 
finishing grain crop harvest in between rain events, preparing for winter 
grazing, equipment maintenance, and preparations for 2021 season.
WASHINGTON:     The Statewide temperatures in Washington for the month of 
December were slightly below normal to above normal throughout the State. In 
San Juan County, the month of December was extremely wet. Many lowland fields 
were flooded with storm water. Most ponds had already filled, which was about 
two months early. Livestock were on stockpiled feed and those farms with 
adequate heavy-use areas with cover had livestock out of the weather. The 
pruning of berry crops was completed in some locations with orchard trees and 
vines to be next. In Skagit County, the fields were very wet. In Snohomish 
County, it was so wet that nothing was happening outside. Fields were beyond 
saturated. Water pooled everywhere. Seed orders were commencing. In Yakima 
County, vegetable fields were mostly tilled and ready to plant. Orchards were 
in the process of being pruned and trained. There was a significant amount of 
orchard tear out. In Klickitat County, moisture was received. No cropping 
happened at this time of the year. Ranchers were busy feeding livestock in 
ideal conditions, due to the lack of snow. In northeast Washington, the 
winter had been mild. Snow was received in the northern part of Stevens 
County on December 30. In east central Washington, snow continued to 
accumulate, providing insulation to winter wheat and alleviating drought 
conditions. No fieldwork was occurring. Crop conditions were good. Winter 
wheat conditions were normal. Cattle were being moved to feeding grounds. In 
southwest Washington, most winter crops looked good. The soil moisture 
content was coming back up due to the winter rains.
WEST VIRGINIA:     For the week ending January 3, Topsoil moisture 11% short, 
69% adequate, and 20% surplus. Subsoil moisture 9% short, 77% adequate, and 
14% surplus. Hay and roughage supplies 12% short, 80% adequate, and 8% 
surplus. Feed grain supplies 10% short, 84% adequate, and 6% surplus. Winter 
wheat condition 47% fair, 52% good, and 1% excellent. Cattle and calves 
condition 2% poor, 28% fair, 64% good, and 6% excellent. Sheep and lambs 
condition 3% poor, 23% fair, 69% good, and 5% excellent. Weather conditions 
for the month have been a mix of warmer and cooler temperatures with periods 
of rain and some snow. Farming activities for the month included feeding hay 
and grain to livestock.
WISCONSIN:     December temperatures at the five major weather stations were 
all above normal. They ranged from 6.6 degrees above normal in Green Bay to 
3.3 degrees above normal in Madison. Average highs ranged from 32.8 degrees 
in Eau Claire to 37.9 degrees in Milwaukee, while average lows ranged from 
15.4 degrees in Eau Claire to 25.5 degrees in Milwaukee. Precipitation ranged 
from 0.36 inches in La Crosse to 2.15 inches in Milwaukee. Madison received 
the most snowfall out of the major cities with 13.5 inches. Eau Claire 
received the least, with 3.7 inches of snow for the month. Much of Wisconsin 
remains covered in snow following storms received in the last days of 
December. Despite frozen ground halting tillage for the winter, mild 
temperatures helped manure hauling and livestock feeding activities.
WYOMING:     This report for Wyoming is for the entire month of December 
2020. Topsoil moisture 35% very short, 44% short, 21% adequate. Subsoil 
moisture 49% very short, 33% short, 18% adequate. Winter wheat condition 5% 
very poor, 9% poor, 71% fair, 10% good, 5% excellent. Livestock condition 3% 
poor, 28% fair, 68% excellent, 1% excellent. Stock water supplies 15% very 
short, 14% short, 71% adequate. Hay and roughage supplies 18% very short, 21% 
short, 60% adequate, 1% surplus. Pasture and range condition 23% very poor, 
24% poor, 41% fair, 12% good. Wyoming's drought conditions held fast for the 
month of December. According to the National Integrated Drought Information 
System's report released December 31, 2020, the amount of land rated 
abnormally dry, moderately dry, severely dry, and extremely dry were 8.3%, 
33.2%, 28.4% and 25.4%, respectively. A small portion of the State was 
experiencing exceptional drought conditions at 0.4%. Producers are hoping for 
sufficient spring moisture given the current lack of precipitation. Snow was 
on the ground in areas of the Southwest, but totals were below normal. 
Dryness persisted in East-central portions of the State according to one 
reporter, with below normal snowpack.

Statistical Methodology

Survey Procedures: Crop progress and condition estimates included in this 
report are based on survey data collected in December, January, February, and 
March. The non-probability crop progress and condition surveys include input 
from approximately 4,000 respondents whose occupations provide them 
opportunities to make visual observations and frequently bring them in 
contact with farmers in their counties. Based on standard definitions, these 
respondents subjectively estimate the progress of crops through various 
stages of development, as well as the progress of producer activities. They 
also provide subjective evaluations of crop and soil moisture conditions. Any 
weather data mentioned in this report is provided by outside sources such as 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Agricultural 
Weather Information Service (AWIS).

Information Contacts

Listed below are the commodity statisticians in the Crops Branch of the 
National Agricultural Statistics Service to contact for additional 
information. E-mail inquiries may be sent to nass@usda.gov

Lance Honig, Chief, Crops Branch.............................. (202) 720-2127

Chris Hawthorn, Head, Field Crops Section..................... (202) 720-2127
     Irwin Anolik - Crop Weather.............................. (202) 720-7621
     Joshua Bates - Oats, Soybeans............................ (202) 690-3234
     David Colwell - Current Agricultural Industrial Reports.. (202) 720-8800
     James Johanson - Barley, County Estimates, Hay........... (202) 690-8533
     Greg Lemmons - Corn, Flaxseed, Proso Millet.............. (202) 720-9526
     Jean Porter - Rye, Wheat................................. (202) 720-8068
     Becky Sommer - Cotton, Cotton Ginnings, Sorghum.......... (202) 720-5944
     John Stephens - Peanuts, Rice............................ (202) 720-7688
     Travis Thorson - Sunflower, Other Oilseeds............... (202) 720-7369

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